Happy Holidays! from In Yoga Consulting

JES-Holdings-2018-Happy-Holidays

Wishing you and yours and very Merry Holiday.

If you’re surrounded by family and loved one’s, remember to toast to
good health and togetherness.

If you are with friends, remember to express gratitude for
connectedness and unconditionality.

If you find yourself alone at the holidays, remember to take this time to practice
self-care, move slowly, and remember all that you’ve accomplished this year.

Wherever you are, whoever you’re with, give yourself permission to unplug and let go.

Well wishes for a joyful and restful holiday season,

Amy

PS: My gift for you! See Happy Holidays! (your Asana Cheatsheet) and remember to keep up your home practice during the holiday break. (Even if more for sanity than fitness…) Originally published to the In Yoga blog on Dec. 24th 2014.

happy holidays yogamyla
Holidays Asana, circa Dec. 24th 2014

In Yoga: On Growth

Dear All,

It’s been a while since I’ve felt ready to sit down (or in my case, stand up) and write.

The focus has been on growth.

And with radical growth comes discomfort, mental/emotional fatigue, introversion and coping. It took me a while to realize, these are not moments to be shunned and shamed. These are as real as the joyful moments. They are part of me. And how I react is part of me. So who do I want to be? How do I want to show up for growth?

I recently (in September) moved back to Los Angeles to take on the role of Program Associate for Graduate Yoga Studies at Loyola Marymount University (big shoes to fill, from Sarah Herrington, founder of OM Schooled and author of Idiot’s Guide to Yoga). I am honored to be serving with my teacher, Dr. Christopher Key Chapple, for what I have deemed, ‘The White House of Yoga,’ a think tank for ‘next steps’ in the evolution of Yoga and Yoga Therapy in the States; supported and funded in part by Indian institutions and scholars. (Check out their ‘first of their kind programs in the nation’ here.)

However exciting, jumping into a new academic year with three days to “settle in,” growth inevitably occurred. I increased my time management and task efficiency, and was challenged to more clearly define my work life boundaries. When does work end? At the beginning of a new chapter, what type of life do I want to create? What do I want to leave more space for? And the perennial: How do I balance it all?

Growth. Because of growth – namely in this instance, the support, dedication and kindness of a community of Yoga aspirants in North Port, FL – “the studio” North Port Yoga + Wellness is moving into a 33% larger space on January 1st. Tangible growth.

When Angel + Matt Loflin joined as co-owners, we dreamed of this space. We named two conjoined spaces – one dedicated to massage therapy, acupuncture and energy healing work (“Wellness”) and one dedicated to classes and trainings in Yoga tradition (Not fitness, but exclusively highlighting Eastern, Western, and Oriental Yoga methodology, including Tai Chi,  Qi Gong, in a modern context).  We dreamed we would create a safe space for healing and self-discovery for the community to come together. We would become known for our high quality teachers and trainings. We would use Yoga as our ethics, as our business mentor. We would give of ourselves whenever possible in awareness of the law of karma and our imminent abundance in exchange for selfless service (Seva). We would give, give, give to this space so it had a chance to thrive. We knew if we did it right by staying grounded in Yoga, we had no choice but to succeed.

So far so good.

How does Yoga really tie in here? (No, Yoga’s not magic – or a religion.)

Re: Bhagavad Gita (reportedly on the night stand of the greatest paradigm shifters of our time: Martin Luther King Jr, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and Caser Chavez):

“To action alone you have a right and never to its fruits. Let not your motive be the fruits of action; nor let there be in you any attachment to inaction.

Fixed in yoga, O winner of wealth, do your work, renouncing attachment and remaining even-minded in both success and failure. This equanimity of mind is called Yoga” (Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2, verses 47-48, Murthy 1995).

It’s one thing to read it and another to live it.
Now try living it in business…”even-minded in both success and failure.”

I am so thankful to have been gifted partners in business and in life who are similarly guided by a spiritual life; meaning for me here: a sense of greater purpose. We share an excitement for our individual paths (preferred methods and modalities) and shared dharma (to provide a center for healing, to heal ourselves, and to help provide healing for others) which time and time again, puts gas in the tank.

We know we will be rewarded because as long as we have trusted and shown up to do the work, we have always had enough.

It’s both the reason for and the process of my and the studio’s growth.

I am grateful for the synchronicities that have allowed for my personal and professional evolution this year (thanks to the patience of Angel and Matt Loflin).

I am grateful for the struggle and discomfort of growth for making me who I am and who I am becoming.

I am grateful for our community (meaning here, the NPYW tribe) who’s willingness to meet me in authenticity allowed me to live into my Self for the first time.

I am grateful for the growth that comes from the unknown, and all that’s still to unfold in the coming year…

I am grateful.

This is growth in Yoga.

I see you, Growth.

In gratitude for the In Yoga community – both newcomers and those who have followed along for years – thank you for seeing me and being champions of this wild journey in Yoga.

All One,

Amy

 

Online Self Care Series

Holiday Self Care Series
Holiday Self Care Series

 

Start off the Season with Self Care

Join me in for my first ONLINE course: Holiday Self Care Series 

$49 for 5 weeks of classes you can reference each and every holiday season, or throughout the year!

**On your own time, in your own home**

What You Need to Know:

Videos will be released each Monday from November 26 to December 24th. You are able to download and save the videos to your computer for future viewing. Each video will be 45-60 minutes in length and include a minimum of 15 minutes of guided movement, breathwork and/or meditation.

Topics covered in this series will include:

– Week 1: Intro to Yoga for Self Care (Asana + Pranayama)
– Week 2: The Practice of Contentment
– Week 3: Loving Kindness + Mindfulness Meditation
– Week 4: Healthy Boundaries for Happiness
– Week 5: Off the Mat: Yoga for the Present

_____________________________________________

To Register:
1) Click the link below and pay $49 registration (<$10/class!)

www.paypal.me/amyinyoga

2) Wait to receive follow-up e-mail confirming your registration.

Didn’t receive an e-mail?
Reach out to me directly at
amy@ayearinyoga.com with any questions.

3) Optional: Join Secret Facebook Group for practitioners or receive e-mail links to download weekly videos

_____________________________________________

Not sure you’re ready to make the plunge? Contact info@ayearinyoga.com with questions or to learn more about upcoming class offerings!

Ready to Save Your Spot?

Get started by making payment to: www.paypal.me/amyinyoga

NEW! Yoga + Meditation Back to School

Hello All! (particularly SWFL friends)

Exciting News: Yoga and Meditation are going to back to school!

Fall 2018 STC schedule graphic.png

Join me for one or several five week courses in Yoga and/or Meditation at Suncoast Technical College in North Port OR Sarasota, FL to being Oct. 1st!

All courses are $49 for five weeks / classes.

Limited space and time to register!

Registration available here:

941-361-6590

or

https://sarasotacountyschools.net/schools/ace/

See “Course Catalog”

Located outside of SWFL and looking for a chance to dive deeper? Hang tight!

Online courses and additional trainings to come in 2019

Now Accepting Remote Clients!

In yoga black and white

Now Accepting Remote Clients!

Enjoy private customized yoga practice at home, on your own schedule.


Check out “First Dibs” deal below!
First 3 New Clients for A Year in Yoga private instruction save $1,000!

Give the Gift of Wellness for Mother’s Day!

Schedule private session here or e-mail: info@ayearinyoga.com

“First Dibs” A Year in Yoga Deposit

$250 deposit, refundable within 10 days minus 25% processing and administrative fee. Client will be contacted for confirmation and payment plan information within 3-4 days of initial deposit. A Year in Yoga Includes: 6 week Foundations Video Series Download (2 hours each) Bi Weekly On-site, Phone or Video Check-In’s Custom Practice or “Sadhana” Custom regular practice designed to meet your specific needs Journal Entries to monitor and measure progress Video Feedback (up to 12 videos) adjust and modify your practice as things arise in your life First 3 Clients (First Dibs): $1,999 / year Then: $2,999 6 months In Yoga: $1,499 / 6 months *Flexible payment plans available

$250.00

 

individual options 2018 1individual options 2018 2
Trouble reading the PDF? View here.

 



Get Away Weekend, In Mindfulness

Mindful Moments Retreat June 2018

Continue reading “Now Accepting Remote Clients!”

Mindful Moments On + Off the Mat

I am excited to announce my first “retreat” to be held at North Port Yoga + Wellness with friend and colleague, Gisela Bouvier, RDN, founder of Mindfully Intuitive Nutrition.

Join us for a memorable weekend immersion in yoga, mindfulness and nutrition. Find food freedom and learn to practice yoga on and off the mat. Discover peace of mind in all aspects of life.

Questions? Shoot me an email at amy@northportyoga.org

We hope to see you then!

Mindful Moments Retreat June 2018

Coming out of numbness

Coming out of numbness. What the fuck does that even mean? When we go through a period of intense emotional exertion and purging, our bodies and minds need time to recover. I won’t cite a text in support, but can tell you from a series of traumatic life-altering impulsive decisions passed, and from my current emerging circumstance, that loss and grief are real. It’s numbing. And surprisingly it’s noticeable; but only to those closest to you (and even this might surprise you).

Just because you’re a yogi doesn’t mean you don’t have hiccups (figuratively or literally). I make a lot of mistakes. I look back on my day and wonder if I came off differently than I intended. I’m insecure and cautious. But, being a yogi means that I walk through my day knowing that at the bottom of it all, there is a net to catch me. That I am someone who is just as important (and equally insignificant) as every other human being. I am valuable, I have a contribution to make. It’s a foundation in my heart that goes beyond friends and families, and formalities. In darkness, it’s easy to get lost; but the Self is a cheerleader, teacher, wise man and friend. The voice inside that says, “This will get better.” “Hang on a little longer.” The change in my life has been incessant for over three years now. From job to job to grad school to job, the only consistencies in my life – friends and relationships – have also largely dissipated. So there comes a time when we question ourselves; did I make the right decisions? To trust, to go forth, to give our energy in this particular direction?

I don’t regret a single decision I’ve made, because at that moment I thought it was the right one.

So, either I live with the consequences or I stay true to my impulses, perhaps revealing another side of myself. Life is about this journey, of mistakes and folly. Our only job in life is to follow it.

That’s where I’m devoting my attention now, to my present ever-evolving circumstance. With an awareness that a flow to life exists which I have no power over. Like a current, it sweeps us through life at its leisure, pulling against our selfish attempts to disembark, to choose our own direction driven by mind and matter rather than by heart (intuition). Taping into that foundation – the one I cultivate and continually find through the repetition of daily meditation – gives me a place to go, to remove myself from outside pressures to reside in nothing. It’s also in their songs, have you heard? Listen. The Beatles, John Lennon, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan to name a few. When we give up ourselves to creativity in any form, we give our minds over to the current trajectory of our lives. In Buddhism, this is called “right knowledge.”

Sometimes I find it difficult to reign it in, as they say, when my mind expands to a point of all-encompassing awareness. I can feel the cries abroad and here at home in my heart. And I know many others share this gift and torture. What can we do? Love our neighbor despite themselves. Be true to your values, and if you need inspiration google the Yamas and Niyamas; every religion hits upon these tenants in some form. No matter what you call them, they’re useful and important.

So that’s the take away. And in the meantime we will continue to explore what it is to emerge from numbness and isolation; regardless of your outward persona. Whenever you doubt, question or fear, know it is not you. We all suffer from the same vices, and the only way to emerge gracefully is to move harmoniously.

x Amy

Challenging Concepts of the “Western Yogi” Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga

Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga
By: Vivi Vallin, M.A.

I am currently in a yoga teacher training at a studio in East Los Angeles called People’s Yoga. They are the first yoga studio in this particular area of Los Angeles and are going to be celebrating their two-year anniversary in the coming weeks. People’s Yoga prides itself in making yoga accessible to the community of East Los Angeles. Classes are affordable, some are bilingual or in Spanish, there are classes for families to practice together, many of the instructors are people of color and the studio is accessible via public transportation. This year they offered their first 200-hour yoga teacher training. The others in my cohort are also people of color. All different backgrounds and ages but sharing the experience of what it is like to be a person of color who has been drawn to yoga on their own healing journey. As we learn about yoga together, we also share our experiences of feeling excluded, navigating being undocumented, being a queer person of color, how yoga is viewed by our families, and how we view injustices every day. We have a space in yoga to integrate our cultural and ethnic identities and experiences from that identity. This process is powerful.

On a personal level, I believe practicing yoga brings you closer and closer to your authentic self. Although yoga did not originate in Mexico, practicing yoga as a Mexican-American has brought me closer to my own culture’s healing practices, my roots, my history, and my family. I think this is because of yoga’s ability to cultivate self-awareness and self-love. In yoga, we embrace all parts of ourselves. From this space, I can see that a yoga practice brings individuals closer to who they really are. Each of us is unique. Our stories and experiences are unique. If we allow space to share and unite these stories, the experience of each of us will be richer and more full.

Black, white or brown (or however you identify) – we can all be united in our experiences of trauma, pain, sadness, joy, happiness, and gratitude. These are universal human emotions that link us together. We can heal together.  As we move toward this ideal, we still need to acknowledge that there is a need for safe spaces to heal for marginalized groups. It may look like a yoga studio that opens in East Los Angeles. It may look like a workshop about traditional Mexican healing practices. Each community should have the right to access safe spaces to provide wellness and healing, individually and together. Each community should have the right to choose the practices that will help them heal. Healing movements and leaders historically emerge from within their own community. In this case, as fellow brothers and sisters in color and among all throughout Los Angeles, our shared role is to respect and support this work for authentic and accurate cultural representation in any way we can.

BLACK YOGA TEACHERES ALLIANCE

When I heard about the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance (BYTA) I was excited and wanted to learn more about their work. The group was founded in 2008 and first began as a social media group. The goal was to create a safe space for teachers, students, practitioners, healers and enthusiasts to discuss yoga, share resources and create community. They wanted to create a place to explore the many paths and types of yoga, while also incorporating the authentic spirituality that black yoga teachers bring to the practice of yoga.

The BYTA provides their collective community with resources about teacher trainings, educational programs about yoga, scholarship opportunities and yoga publications. It also launched its first national initiative named Yoga as a Peace Practice: Redefining black lives and restoring peace and pride in our homes and communities. The initiative includes offering curriculum to yoga teachers so that they can take action by offering yoga, meditation practices and yoga based on lifestyle philosophies among those who are victims of violence (BYTA.com).

Since 2008, the group expanded and will be holding its first major retreat and conference in August 2016. The speakers being highlighted are black yoga instructors who have been leaders in this movement for a long time. The BYTA wants to celebrate and highlight these leaders that do not often get the recognition and space to share their wisdom and experience. The conference information describes that there will be an emphasis on the experience of being black in yoga and in this nation, as well as spaces to share and heal in community.

The Black Yoga Teacher Alliance currently has a Kickstarter Fundraiser organized by Jacoby Ballard of Third Root Community Center. The fundraiser aims to raise enough money to support 10 scholarships to black yogis who otherwise would not be able to attend the conference. A second goal of the campaign is to have 1000 white yogis donate to support the campaign. This would be a sign of support and send a powerful message that these types of safe spaces and events are important.

I donated to the BYTA scholarship fund because I support their efforts to create safe space for and to celebrate black yogis. They are not only sharing yoga but also leading the way with national initiatives that use the practice of yoga to engage with major issues such as violence and victims of violence, especially in black communities. I encourage those of you who are part of a yoga community to also support by donating to the scholarship fund, finding out more about the BYTA and/or attending the conference to learn more about their work first hand. Their efforts and contributions to the broader yoga community are valuable and are contributing to breaking stereotypes of exclusivity in mainstream yoga.

 

BYA logo

 

See what the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance is up to, get involved or donate here.
Photo Cred: BYTA.com

Challenging Concepts of the "Western Yogi" Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga

Part III: Safe Spaces in Yoga
By: Vivi Vallin, M.A.

I am currently in a yoga teacher training at a studio in East Los Angeles called People’s Yoga. They are the first yoga studio in this particular area of Los Angeles and are going to be celebrating their two-year anniversary in the coming weeks. People’s Yoga prides itself in making yoga accessible to the community of East Los Angeles. Classes are affordable, some are bilingual or in Spanish, there are classes for families to practice together, many of the instructors are people of color and the studio is accessible via public transportation. This year they offered their first 200-hour yoga teacher training. The others in my cohort are also people of color. All different backgrounds and ages but sharing the experience of what it is like to be a person of color who has been drawn to yoga on their own healing journey. As we learn about yoga together, we also share our experiences of feeling excluded, navigating being undocumented, being a queer person of color, how yoga is viewed by our families, and how we view injustices every day. We have a space in yoga to integrate our cultural and ethnic identities and experiences from that identity. This process is powerful.

On a personal level, I believe practicing yoga brings you closer and closer to your authentic self. Although yoga did not originate in Mexico, practicing yoga as a Mexican-American has brought me closer to my own culture’s healing practices, my roots, my history, and my family. I think this is because of yoga’s ability to cultivate self-awareness and self-love. In yoga, we embrace all parts of ourselves. From this space, I can see that a yoga practice brings individuals closer to who they really are. Each of us is unique. Our stories and experiences are unique. If we allow space to share and unite these stories, the experience of each of us will be richer and more full.

Black, white or brown (or however you identify) – we can all be united in our experiences of trauma, pain, sadness, joy, happiness, and gratitude. These are universal human emotions that link us together. We can heal together.  As we move toward this ideal, we still need to acknowledge that there is a need for safe spaces to heal for marginalized groups. It may look like a yoga studio that opens in East Los Angeles. It may look like a workshop about traditional Mexican healing practices. Each community should have the right to access safe spaces to provide wellness and healing, individually and together. Each community should have the right to choose the practices that will help them heal. Healing movements and leaders historically emerge from within their own community. In this case, as fellow brothers and sisters in color and among all throughout Los Angeles, our shared role is to respect and support this work for authentic and accurate cultural representation in any way we can.

BLACK YOGA TEACHERES ALLIANCE

When I heard about the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance (BYTA) I was excited and wanted to learn more about their work. The group was founded in 2008 and first began as a social media group. The goal was to create a safe space for teachers, students, practitioners, healers and enthusiasts to discuss yoga, share resources and create community. They wanted to create a place to explore the many paths and types of yoga, while also incorporating the authentic spirituality that black yoga teachers bring to the practice of yoga.

The BYTA provides their collective community with resources about teacher trainings, educational programs about yoga, scholarship opportunities and yoga publications. It also launched its first national initiative named Yoga as a Peace Practice: Redefining black lives and restoring peace and pride in our homes and communities. The initiative includes offering curriculum to yoga teachers so that they can take action by offering yoga, meditation practices and yoga based on lifestyle philosophies among those who are victims of violence (BYTA.com).

Since 2008, the group expanded and will be holding its first major retreat and conference in August 2016. The speakers being highlighted are black yoga instructors who have been leaders in this movement for a long time. The BYTA wants to celebrate and highlight these leaders that do not often get the recognition and space to share their wisdom and experience. The conference information describes that there will be an emphasis on the experience of being black in yoga and in this nation, as well as spaces to share and heal in community.

The Black Yoga Teacher Alliance currently has a Kickstarter Fundraiser organized by Jacoby Ballard of Third Root Community Center. The fundraiser aims to raise enough money to support 10 scholarships to black yogis who otherwise would not be able to attend the conference. A second goal of the campaign is to have 1000 white yogis donate to support the campaign. This would be a sign of support and send a powerful message that these types of safe spaces and events are important.

I donated to the BYTA scholarship fund because I support their efforts to create safe space for and to celebrate black yogis. They are not only sharing yoga but also leading the way with national initiatives that use the practice of yoga to engage with major issues such as violence and victims of violence, especially in black communities. I encourage those of you who are part of a yoga community to also support by donating to the scholarship fund, finding out more about the BYTA and/or attending the conference to learn more about their work first hand. Their efforts and contributions to the broader yoga community are valuable and are contributing to breaking stereotypes of exclusivity in mainstream yoga.

 

BYA logo

 

See what the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance is up to, get involved or donate here.
Photo Cred: BYTA.com