Kid’s Thrive Conference SWFL

On Friday, January 31st, I will have the honor of guiding Charlotte County social workers through an all day Keynote presentation highlighting the science and practice of trauma informed mindfulness. Attendees are social workers specifically assigned to working with mothers and children under the age of 5 who have/are engaged in heavy substance abuse.

In the morning, we’ll be reviewing evidence based research on Trauma, Mindfulness and Children, specifically focused on Dr. Bessel von der Kolk’s book, “The Body Keeps the Score.” Applying a trauma informed lens, we can perceive others’ behavior as a reflection of the present moment state of their nervous system. By working with the body’s system to re-regulate through mindfulness, meditation and yoga (asana) practices, both physical and mental health patterns can improve.

Learn more about Trauma, Mindfulness and Children in this NIH study.

In the afternoon, we will integrate what we’ve learned through mindfulness, meditation and yogasana practices, as well as reviewing Trauma Informed Ethics and Teaching Methodology. This is their time to play, relax, recharge – let go and receive.

I look forward to guiding Charlotte County’s social workers in a relaxing, educational and hopefully enlightening day of Trauma Informed Mindfulness study and practice.

Thank you to Diane Ramseyer and Sue Sorenson for giving me with this opportunity, as friends of our home studio North Port Yoga + Wellness.

Onward!

In Yoga,

Amy

Manifest Your New Year

They say hindsight is 2020. Well then, we’re in for an awakening….

A gentle reminder that you can manifest your dreams this year.

They say hindsight is 2020. Well then, we’re in for an awakening….

A gentle reminder that you can manifest your dreams this year.

Listen to your gut. Baby steps. Repeat.

Or, as I often tell my clients: ” Show up” for what you want.

Reflecting on the past year, I am grateful for the official birth of my new business: In Yoga Coaching and Consulting. A long time dream and aspiration. I never ‘thought’ I would actually do it. Until it happened.

But then again, I kept showing up. Even when it was difficult. Even when I hadn’t showered in days, and I was moody. (Sorry, Angel.) Even when I was tired and wished I had more time for myself. Even when I wondered what the hell I was doing. I showed up.

So, my heart is full. That which I never thought possible has manifested. Because of me.

Wishing you fulfillment, joy and clarity of purpose in the coming year.

I believe in you and the gifts you have to offer the world. See you in 2020.

With Love and gratitude,

Amy

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Amy Osborne, M.A. E-RYT, Founder / CEO
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Jelisa Difo, RYT, Reiki Master, Vice President for Wellness Initiatives

 

In Yoga: On Growth

Dear All,

It’s been a while since I’ve felt ready to sit down (or in my case, stand up) and write.

The focus has been on growth.

And with radical growth comes discomfort, mental/emotional fatigue, introversion and coping. It took me a while to realize, these are not moments to be shunned and shamed. These are as real as the joyful moments. They are part of me. And how I react is part of me. So who do I want to be? How do I want to show up for growth?

I recently (in September) moved back to Los Angeles to take on the role of Program Associate for Graduate Yoga Studies at Loyola Marymount University (big shoes to fill, from Sarah Herrington, founder of OM Schooled and author of Idiot’s Guide to Yoga). I am honored to be serving with my teacher, Dr. Christopher Key Chapple, for what I have deemed, ‘The White House of Yoga,’ a think tank for ‘next steps’ in the evolution of Yoga and Yoga Therapy in the States; supported and funded in part by Indian institutions and scholars. (Check out their ‘first of their kind programs in the nation’ here.)

However exciting, jumping into a new academic year with three days to “settle in,” growth inevitably occurred. I increased my time management and task efficiency, and was challenged to more clearly define my work life boundaries. When does work end? At the beginning of a new chapter, what type of life do I want to create? What do I want to leave more space for? And the perennial: How do I balance it all?

Growth. Because of growth – namely in this instance, the support, dedication and kindness of a community of Yoga aspirants in North Port, FL – “the studio” North Port Yoga + Wellness is moving into a 33% larger space on January 1st. Tangible growth.

When Angel + Matt Loflin joined as co-owners, we dreamed of this space. We named two conjoined spaces – one dedicated to massage therapy, acupuncture and energy healing work (“Wellness”) and one dedicated to classes and trainings in Yoga tradition (Not fitness, but exclusively highlighting Eastern, Western, and Oriental Yoga methodology, including Tai Chi,  Qi Gong, in a modern context).  We dreamed we would create a safe space for healing and self-discovery for the community to come together. We would become known for our high quality teachers and trainings. We would use Yoga as our ethics, as our business mentor. We would give of ourselves whenever possible in awareness of the law of karma and our imminent abundance in exchange for selfless service (Seva). We would give, give, give to this space so it had a chance to thrive. We knew if we did it right by staying grounded in Yoga, we had no choice but to succeed.

So far so good.

How does Yoga really tie in here? (No, Yoga’s not magic – or a religion.)

Re: Bhagavad Gita (reportedly on the night stand of the greatest paradigm shifters of our time: Martin Luther King Jr, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and Caser Chavez):

“To action alone you have a right and never to its fruits. Let not your motive be the fruits of action; nor let there be in you any attachment to inaction.

Fixed in yoga, O winner of wealth, do your work, renouncing attachment and remaining even-minded in both success and failure. This equanimity of mind is called Yoga” (Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2, verses 47-48, Murthy 1995).

It’s one thing to read it and another to live it.
Now try living it in business…”even-minded in both success and failure.”

I am so thankful to have been gifted partners in business and in life who are similarly guided by a spiritual life; meaning for me here: a sense of greater purpose. We share an excitement for our individual paths (preferred methods and modalities) and shared dharma (to provide a center for healing, to heal ourselves, and to help provide healing for others) which time and time again, puts gas in the tank.

We know we will be rewarded because as long as we have trusted and shown up to do the work, we have always had enough.

It’s both the reason for and the process of my and the studio’s growth.

I am grateful for the synchronicities that have allowed for my personal and professional evolution this year (thanks to the patience of Angel and Matt Loflin).

I am grateful for the struggle and discomfort of growth for making me who I am and who I am becoming.

I am grateful for our community (meaning here, the NPYW tribe) who’s willingness to meet me in authenticity allowed me to live into my Self for the first time.

I am grateful for the growth that comes from the unknown, and all that’s still to unfold in the coming year…

I am grateful.

This is growth in Yoga.

I see you, Growth.

In gratitude for the In Yoga community – both newcomers and those who have followed along for years – thank you for seeing me and being champions of this wild journey in Yoga.

All One,

Amy

 

A Day with Robert Sturman

In Yoga Consulting’s Founder, Amy Osborne, and her faithful pup, Shakti, were honored to spend the day with international yoga photographer, Robert Sturman on November 23rd. Although the photoshoot was intended to highlight meditative asana, Shakti had other plans and wouldn’t leave her Mama’s side. Protector and ultimate ham…

We are grateful for the outcome and to share the gift of these images with you all.

Happy Holidays!

Love,

Amy + Shakti

 

Special thanks to friend in Yoga, Robert Sturman, for the gift of his time and talent. 

 

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Meditation I
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Meditation II
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Meditation III

Welcome Re3 Healing!

A special welcome + thanks to
In Yoga Consulting’s newest client!

A special welcome + thanks to

In Yoga Consulting’s newest client:

 

re3 logo high res

In Yoga Consulting is excited and honored to assist Re3 Healing Aesthetics and Wellness in the development of its new wellness center, including contractor recruitment, training, management and scheduling.

Re3 Healing Aesthetics and Wellness’ mission statement parallels our own, to “to improve wellness both inside and out.” In partnership, we aim to offer a wide variety of holistic practices to help nourish the mind, body, and soul to improve the quality of life of Re3’s clients. We acknowledge that each patient is different and requires a thoughtful and dedicated approach to healing.

Re3 and In Yoga’s comprehensive Wellness Program “leads with the leak,” addressing dis-ease as its source. By educating clients on the science and physiology of the body and promoting techniques for self-regulation, In Yoga instructors provide the ‘missing link’ in holistic wellness through a mentally and physically embodied approach.

Following recent discussions on Re3 Healing’s needs related to Wellness Center development, we have agreed to focus on the following areas:

  • Integrative Health Open House
    • Once monthly overview of diverse wellness services and physiological benefits
  • Integrative Health Introductory Series
    • Align schedule with existing 360° 12 week series
  • Wellness Classes + Tiered Memberships
  • 200 Hour Teacher Training Course
    • Facilitate quality therapeutic training of 360° instructors in Sarasota/Venice
    • Summer 2020
  • Therapeutic Private Sessions
  • Yoga Therapy 2021
  • Retreat Options

We look forward to all still to unfold as we kick of the new year with this new opportunity and the same goal: to provide alternative methods of healing to all.

Stay tuned as we expand our offerings at Re3 Healing and throughout the community in Sarasota, FL, Los Angeles, CA and beyond!

 

Love + Light,

Amy and Jelisa

Now Accepting Remote Clients!

In yoga black and white

Now Accepting Remote Clients!

Enjoy private customized yoga practice at home, on your own schedule.


Check out “First Dibs” deal below!
First 3 New Clients for A Year in Yoga private instruction save $1,000!

Give the Gift of Wellness for Mother’s Day!

Schedule private session here or e-mail: info@ayearinyoga.com

“First Dibs” A Year in Yoga Deposit

$250 deposit, refundable within 10 days minus 25% processing and administrative fee. Client will be contacted for confirmation and payment plan information within 3-4 days of initial deposit. A Year in Yoga Includes: 6 week Foundations Video Series Download (2 hours each) Bi Weekly On-site, Phone or Video Check-In’s Custom Practice or “Sadhana” Custom regular practice designed to meet your specific needs Journal Entries to monitor and measure progress Video Feedback (up to 12 videos) adjust and modify your practice as things arise in your life First 3 Clients (First Dibs): $1,999 / year Then: $2,999 6 months In Yoga: $1,499 / 6 months *Flexible payment plans available

$250.00

 

individual options 2018 1individual options 2018 2
Trouble reading the PDF? View here.

 



Get Away Weekend, In Mindfulness

Mindful Moments Retreat June 2018

Continue reading “Now Accepting Remote Clients!”

Guest Post: Meditation and the joy in every moment

Ben began his practice in 2003, Since studying at his local physiotherapy clinic, Ben has expanded his scope to include yoga acupressure, acupuncture, naturopathic medicine and applied kinesiology.

Meditation and the joy in every moment
By: Ben Rogers, Edited by: Amy Osborne

Meditation has been described as “no mind” or “not thinking.” It is a stilling of the mind for a sustained period of time.

Mastering meditation can sometimes feel like coming home. You feel as if you have simple rediscovered something that has always been there. The door into tranquility that you know has already been within you is now opened.

For example, if you work in an office, are a musician, painter or another creative field, you likely know that in the midst of creation you are not thinking – but the work is simply flowing through you. Allowing this to happen is quite a challenge, which is why meditating and sitting down before work can be very helpful.

Your mind does not like to be switched off, it will constantly interrupt your meditation, demanding your attention.

Somewhere within each of our minds there is a sanctuary away from the noise and disruption of our own busy thought process. Meditation is about calming that chatter of your mind and rediscovering the calm and still space within yourself.



Breathing and meditation

Don’t forget to breath, that sounds very obvious, but it is a natural instinct for some people to hold their breath when concentrating. Don’t gasp for air, as you get into your meditation your breathing should become more gentle and rhythmic.

Posture for meditations

First imagine the top of your head is being pulled towards the top of the ceiling by an invisible string, so it feels as if your head is floating above your spine. Your chin is slightly lifted, perpendicular with the floor, to open and expand the heart and throat centers.

Relax your shoulders, drawing them back and down, and gently ease your chest (heart center) forward.

Focus and meditations

When you are ready, close your eyes and focus on your breathing, as it comes in and out through each nostril; this is one possible point of focus. This is where your attention can stay. Take several deep breaths and allow your diaphragm to lift, expanding the belly with each full inhalation. Three count inhalation, three count exhalation.

General tips for meditation

  • Don’t think about the past or future – you are participating in the present moment
  • Don’t strain, just breath
  • Don’t have expectations – It may be amazing or just difficult the first, third, and thirty-fifth time you meditate. The practice is simply being with any experience that might arise.
  • Don’t be disappointed – the benefits of meditation come with regular practice and persistence

Exercises for joy on the go

Whether you walking across your living room or across town, consciously slow your footsteps and pay attention to each sensation in your heel, the ball of your foot and then your toes when they make contact with the ground. (Walking Meditation) Notice how this simple practice relaxes your stride and your breath as your attention settles into the fullness of your present moment awareness as you go along with your day.

Observe your thoughts as you walk. What are you thinking about? Can you see a tree, person or car go past without internally labeling it? Practice moving though your surroundings without attaching thoughts, stories or judgments on what you see.

Exercise your heart (cardiac/circulatory system) whether it is bicycle riding, skating or dancing. Find an aerobic activity that brings you pleasure and you can joyfully commit to for half an hour or more during the day.


Wouldn’t it be nice if we could skip past the pain and fast forward to the bliss? The truth is to experience true contentment, we must be willing to feel all of our emotions, from despair to sadness. Our willingness to accept the moment, acknowledge the emotion and be willing to let that go is to find true peace.

Meditation is a tool that teaches us to meet ourselves (and others) where we are, and to be with whatever thoughts and feelings arise without attachment or judgement.

While the practice of meditation is profound, it is also quite simple to learn. There are many types of meditation, from walking meditation, contemplative writing, chanting or focusing on objects. But all forms of meditation begin with getting still and quite inside.

 

Join Amy for Meditation 101 at North Port Yoga to learn six methods of meditation to kick start your personal practice. amy@northportyoga.org / www.northportyoga.org

 

Perfectly Imperfect

All of a sudden, I feel like Britney Spears. She was right. I’m not a girl, not yet a woman. And, it f***ing sucks. Excuse my language.

I have become more adult in the past six months, it feels, than ever before. Although this could be attributed simply to my fleeing Los Angeles (where adult children thrive) in my new role as a business owner in suburbia, there’s also been a lot of other shifting. Shifting into a sense of suddenly knowing. Knowing what? Ironically, I have no idea. And yet, a calm persists. I’ll take it.

[Shakti rams her head against my leg in a rewarded effort to engorge her beef meaty bone.] Perfect imperfection is a practice I’m embracing full force. It means that I can arrive 10-15 (sometimes even 20) minutes late to any engagement and feel justified; I’m imperfect. Haven’t you heard? I still feel terrible but send an early notice text that I’m running behind. I’m imperfect after all. And that’s all imperfect people are expected to do. Move forward. Be human. Embrace whatever’s happening with humble honesty. We’re all imperfect after all.

So, I’ve found some of the happiest moments during my indulgence in imperfection. It’s a painful thing to lose people due to a perceived imperfection, or several – just because nobody’s perfect. I’ve found that many of the people I admire most in my life have lost others through a prolonged misunderstanding, or unresolved disagreement. It’s a painful point, but I’ve realized that self-conception is everything. And that if I can truly live with myself happily, I’m more able to live with others well. I honor the moments of my imperfection as benchmarks and growing pains. Anyone who can’t wait out my darkest moments doesn’t deserve my best and brightest. An unfortunate truth.

I’ve learned that honoring myself is an acceptable first priority. I’m ever grateful to the many strong women in my life who have encouraged me to feel, honor and acknowledge the difficult moments in my life. The sooner we acknowledge our vulnerabilities the stronger we become. I believe it, and I’ve seen it. I’m ever stronger from the village and tribe that has emerged in this community. With me, not from me or for me, they thrive; we thrive.

It’s clear how we can be happiest in life, finally. Loving others, serving others, loving yourself, serving yourself. From there, everything else comes easily.

More adventures to come no doubt. Just an update to let you know I’m thinking of you. Like love notes from my heart…I’m inspired to approach life with curiosity, because I have a reason to share it. Thanks for reading.

Cheers/YOLO/with gratitude,
Amy

On being REAL

This week, my work is in the height of its expansion – breaking through a concrete wall on the South side of the building to create new work stations for employees working on a highly confidential project. As a result, there is no parking, no air conditioning, increased noise level, and low morale.

Is there ever a better time to practice yoga?

Yet, a lot of people seem surprised when I share that my own practice nowdays doesn’t always contain asana postures. In fact, finding myself in an unfortunate conglomerate of transitional life circumstances, asana is the last thing my body or mind feels fit to undertake. And that’s okay. Here lies my yoga: non-judgement during my own process of flux, transition, and hardship, and instead a self-awareness of what I do need. Be it rest, time with friends, or a glass of wine – it is all okay. Part of yoga, as we know, is being compassionate and empathetic toward your neighbor, particularly during times of hardship. This same rule applies to yourself. Forgiveness and understanding can reduce and virtually eradicate stress.

Today I was three hours late to work. I overslept my alarm, tried to anticipate but miscalculated my boss’ needs, and had to bring my pup to doggy care to allow myself the time to make up the additional hours at the end of the day. At one time in my life (not too long ago), I would have experienced physical pain in my chest, a headache, nausea, and perhaps even hyperventilated over my inability to meet my employers’ expectations. My identity was absorbed in others’ view of me, particularly that of my employer. But not anymore.

For better or worse, I’ve undergone a transformative process through yoga by erasing and re-scripting my personal narrative to one of understanding, of self-care, and of compassion. There’s still work to be done to adopt unconditional self-love (I too have my days…), and carry this understanding into all aspects of my life. But I will say, I no longer have anxiety attacks and it’s not the meds (because I’ve tried those too). Rather, it was my willingness time and time again to stop and say: What will really happen if I do this? What is the worst case scenario? And I was surprised to see time and time again, that the thing I feared the most was others’ opinions of me. Yet, they had no idea who I really was or where this decision was coming from. Trusting myself to make the best decisions for me and remaining open-minded to criticism, communicative with all parties, and transparent about my intent – I’ve found that the worst case scenario rarely comes true. And, if it does, I know in my heart that I did the best I could, and we can’t please everyone in this life.

Nina Simone  (featured above) says in a song, something like, “If we spend our lives trying to please everyone, we’ll die still trying.” Putting ourselves first in daily decision making is something I feel strongly about. Because only you know where you’re at, and only you have to live with the consequences. Go easy, be compassionate with yourself, and you’ll find the same compassion and caring – with practice – translates into everything you do.

I also feel the need to say: Please feel for your friends and for yourself when you confront one of those rare, but severely disruptive challenges in your/their life. “Coming out of numbness,” as I’ve previously referred to it, is a slow process of untangling the psyche from self-absorption. During trauma our psychology is innately bound by the need to survive the casualty at hand (at least this is how our body and nervous system registers drastic change); and thereby we are likely to find ourselves at a loss for the usual social aptitude or casual lightness that she/he may have previously enjoyed.

When trauma or crisis occurs, we go into survival mode. Parts of our brain that are unnecessary for our survival shut down and those that are most pertinent go into hyper-productivity mode. Meeting my own needs and those of others I directly care for (children, pets, elders) is my top priority. Recognizing social signals and norms to protect the feelings of others, emotional intelligence in an external sense, aside from recognizing signs of danger through hyper-vigilance are not necessary for survival. This is when you might notice a friend has “changed” or gone off their rocker. Nurturing, love, patience and forgiveness heals all. Judgement, condemnation, or agitation causes separation and hurt. There is a method to the madness, and time does heal all. But it’s not always so clear when you’re the one stuck in a fog.

Forgive, forgive, forgive and your life will be so much richer. Forgive yourself, forgive others, and strive to understand your enemy. Then, and only then, are you on a path of yoga.

Easier said than done, but it starts with your relationship with you. I’m still working on mine. Knowing my boundaries and recognizing my flaws without internalizing them to a point of pain or self-destruction. Acknowledgement without internalization. Awareness without judgement. We’re here to learn and grow. Don’t stand in the way of your own process.

This is a valid reflection of my own process over the past several months and as I continue to re-find myself as an individual, a woman, a professional, a yogi, a friend, a sister, a daughter. There is room for growth in every role we play, but ultimately we should strive to be the same throughout. To have the same light shine and to let our flaws show true so we may learn from them, grow from them, and leave them behind – as a snake sheds its skin. I look forward to the day when I can finally show my true colors again. Until then, I am an eager slave to my own process, to an understanding of my and others evolution as painful and unpredictable; however, impermanent.

This too shall pass. Stay with it, stay with yourself, stay with me.

So much love,

Amy

 

Challenging Concepts of the "Western Yogi": Part II

By: Viviana Vallin, M.A

The story about how yoga came to be this way is both simple and complex. In a way, it feels like our nation has corrupted traditional yoga. Yoga in itself is a practice of self-awareness, self-inquiry, and self-liberation. It is not inherently exclusive or discriminatory. But, one might say that yoga in the U.S. is just highlighting what is already present in America in terms of a superior body image and commodification.

I recently attended a workshop about cultural appropriation led by Roopa Singh. If you have not read some of her work yet, start here. She is a leader and scholar in exploring these types of questions about yoga in the west and how to honor the history and foundation of traditional yoga. She founded the South Asian American Perspective on Yoga in America (SAAPYA).

During her talk and the conversations that occurred afterward I started to see how we are talking about something much bigger than yoga. America was founded on a white supremacist and capitalism system. In this system, Roopa explains that wellness has also become a commodity. It has become something that is purchased, and therefore is not available to everyone equally. This system makes us believe that there is not enough wellness for everyone. It is a commodity that has been absorbed in inequity, and is disproportionately representing Whiteness.

Yoga has become a wellness commodity that is expensive financially and hard to access for those who are marginalized by society. As an example of this, in my thesis survey many of the people who practice yoga first learned about it through a college course. There is a common tie between access to higher education and access to yoga. The people of color who have been able to find yoga this way are also those who have been able to navigate themselves in spaces where they are commonly the minority. It does not mean, however, that they do not experience the same internalized doubt and fears about not feeling welcomed as their excluded counterparts.

I myself found yoga when I was in college. In some of the studios I have practiced in Los Angeles, I have often looked around and thought about all of the people that never get the opportunity to have this luxury. Even if they would not choose yoga, I found myself mostly concerned with a lack of awareness and opportunity amog many to dedicate time and money in one’s own health and well-being.

In this larger system that benefits only a small portion of our nation, we not only exclude  many from accessing wellness practices, but also increase their toxic burden. In many communities of color you will find higher levels of environmental pollution, limited green spaces, lack of access to fresh food products, increased presence of toxic factories, etc. (Don’t believe me? Google: I heart Wilmington campaign, and see what one community did to fight again exactly that.) I would argue that these communities are then the ones that should receive the most wellness support. Not less. Yet there are very few yoga classes available in communities of color in Los Angeles (i.e. South LA, West Adams, Inglewood), while cities like Silverlake and Santa Monica have an abundance of classes to choose from concentrated within blocks of each other.

You do not have to focus on the yoga studio to see examples of how our society (perhaps unintentionally, but quite actively) works to exclude and marginalize some, and protect and benefit others. I have seen this in higher education, in graduate school, in environmental and conservation groups, in coffee shops that move in to neighborhoods with prices that blatantly exclude those who have lived there their entire lives; and even in trendy restaurants where the majority of the staff are undocumented workers.

The difference is that if we follow the yoga philosophy, yoga can become a tool to help us become aware of ourselves and our role within this larger. Using greater self-awareness, we can move through our lives making choices that align with yogic values and our own values. Roopa posed a powerful question during her talk, asking us, “Who are You Within Yoga?” I would also add: “Who are You Within this System?” How will you use your yoga practice to think and act in the face of injustice, inequality, and violence?

Changing the larger system that has been in place since the birth of the nation is a large task to take on. I think there are a few places to start which are available now. First, let people of color share their experience and tell their stories. (Like I’m doing here…) Often when I share my thoughts about mainstream yoga being exclusive, I have been met with resistance about whether that is a true experience. After my thesis presentation at LMU, I was approached by two white men who had further questions for me. The first asked about whether yoga was in fact becoming more accessible through home videos and the Internet. The second asked about taking yoga outdoors, and whether it was gaining more popularity in parks. Both of these ideas have some truth and significance in recognizing the forward evolution of yoga in the West. Yet, I felt both of these men ultimately missed the point of my presentation.

People of color should not have to use the Internet or find a class in a park in order to have access to yoga and the health benefits they can experience from a regular practice. It also does not change the fact that they are being excluded from the studio experience. Everyone deserves the opportunity to practice in a place where they have an instructor to guide them safely and to build community. If you hear someone telling you that they feel excluded, listen and believe them. Their story does not threaten yours.

Second, we can all support organizations within yoga that are prioritizing people of color and other marginalized groups. This work is important because it allows people of color to share spaces where they feel safe to talk about this experience and to celebrate themselves. It is not about exclusion of others. It is about the support to break through the doubts, fears, and traumas of living within a system that is working against you.


 

Photo Cred: Venice Family Clinic Irma Colen Yoga Class (2014), Culver City, CA

Part III to be released June 22nd…
By: Vivi Vallin, M.A.

On a personal level, I believe practicing yoga brings you closer and closer to your authentic self. Although yoga did not originate in Mexico, practicing yoga as a Mexican-American has brought me closer to my own culture’s healing practices, my roots, my history, and my family.